Rafting Tatshenshini

Beyond cell phone range,
bears walk where few people go
and adventure calls.

The Tatshenshini river flows through Yukon and British Columbia, where it joins the Alsek river and ultimately makes its way to the Pacific Ocean via Alaska. It flows through Glacier Bay National Park, BC Tatshenshini Provincial Park, Kluane National Park and Yukon Game Preserve, which apparently form the largest non-polar ice field in the world (source).

I just got back from an excellent rafting trip on it, and I’d love to share some photos and a video of the experience.

Here are a few photos; there are many more in the Google+ gallery here.


My flight in to Haines, Alaska was the most scenic flight I’ve ever been on
My flight in to Haines, Alaska was the most scenic flight I’ve ever been on
Rafting on the Tatshenshini River
We went on a dayhike up from Sediments Creek. The journey was on steep, narrow trails frequented more by bears than people, and took its toll.
We went on a dayhike up from Sediments Creek. The journey was on steep, narrow trails frequented more by bears than people, and took its toll.
View from the top of a hike near Sediments Creek
Having said that, the view from the top was certainly worth it
Our journey on the Tatshenshini continued on through ever more spectacular scenery. Over the course of a single day's journey to the Confluence, where the Tatshenshini joins the Alsek River, the volume of water in the river increases more than sixfold.
Our journey on the Tatshenshini continued on through ever more spectacular scenery. Over the course of a single day's journey to the Confluence, where the Tatshenshini joins the Alsek River, the volume of water in the river increases more than sixfold.
The Confluence of the Tatshenshini River and the Alsek River: the Alsek comes in from ahead, and veers left, together with the Tat.
The Confluence of the Tatshenshini River and the Alsek River: the Alsek comes in from ahead, and veers left, together with the Tat.
The day after leaving the Confluence, we arrived at Walker Glacier. Walker Glacier is not an official name, but the glacier is known by that name among river guides because it is the glacier that is easiest to get to, providing one an opportunity to walk on it.
The day after leaving the Confluence, we arrived at Walker Glacier. Walker Glacier is not an official name, but the glacier is known by that name among river guides because it is the glacier that is easiest to get to, providing one an opportunity to walk on it.
The last major attraction on our way down the river was Alsek Lake. Alsek Lake is fed by a few glaciers as well as the Alsek river, and is filled with icebergs. These eventually break up into smaller chunks, which then float down the river into Dry Bay and the Pacific ocean. Dodging van-sized icebergs in the middle of rapids is a lot of fun, let me tell you.
The last major attraction on our way down the river was Alsek Lake. Alsek Lake is fed by a few glaciers as well as the Alsek river, and is filled with icebergs. These eventually break up into smaller chunks, which then float down the river into Dry Bay and the Pacific ocean. Dodging van-sized icebergs in the middle of rapids is a lot of fun, let me tell you.

All in all, it was a really wonderful adventure.

Here’s a link to my Google+ gallery with more photos.

Krystof Litomisky's Picture

About Krystof Litomisky

Krystof is an engineer, adventurer, and all-around good guy. He is currently based in Los Angeles, California.

Los Angeles, California

Comments